New Exhibitions Hit the Road

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Now Touring from ExhibitsUSA

ExhibitsUSA brings exhibitions to communities large and small across the country. This week, two new exhibitions begin their five-year tours. We are excited to present Nature’s Blueprints: Biomimicry in Art and Design, open through October 20 at the Putnam Museum and Science Center in Davenport, Iowa, and Aliento a Tequila, opening September 3 at El Museo Latino in Omaha, Nebraska.

Nature’s Blueprints: Biomimicry in Art and Design (pictured) brings together art and design with environmental science using both scientific and artistic objects, as well as interactive learning stations. In an age of complex environmental challenges, why not look to the ingenuity of nature for solutions? The forms, patterns, and processes found in the natural world—refined by 3.8 billion years of evolution—can inspire our design of everything from raincoats to skyscrapers. This approach to innovation, called biomimicry, is becoming increasingly popular. Bird wings. Beehives. Porcupine quills. These have inspired design improvements that enable faster travel, safer buildings, and more precise medical equipment.

Aliento a Tequila (or The Spirit of Tequila) explores and celebrates the landscape, culture, and traditions that gave birth to tequila, Mexico’s mestizo national drink. This series of photographs by Joel Salcido includes the original distilleries that literally founded the industry, as well as several artisanal tequileras committed to the ancestral ways of tequila-making, from harvest to bottle.

Agave dates back to the Aztec civilization as an important crop in Mexico. Since the 1600s, the people of western Mexico have cultivated blue agave from the red volcanic soil that blankets the region, to make what we know as tequila. Photographer Joel Salcido traveled across the state of Jalisco capturing images of distilleries and artisanal tequileras, including blue agave fields at sunset, the agave’s pineapple-like centers (piñas), elegantly shadowed barrel rooms (añejos), and, of course, the agave farmers themselves.

We hope you see these wonderful exhibitions soon in a space near you! Follow their tours on eusa.org.